Man's belch praised as 'greatest of all time'

Timothy Janus crowned World Burping Champ after 18.1 second belch

Published On: Jun 14 2012 10:46:17 AM EDT   Updated On: Jun 15 2012 11:15:05 AM EDT
Burp champ Timothy Janus

The World Burping Federation announced that Timothy Janus, a pizza chef from New York City, has been crowned as the first ever World Burping Champion after delivering an astonishing burp of 18.1 seconds.

Janus set the new belching benchmark at the Burping World Championships in New York City last week. The contest was held to crown the world’s longest belch in open competition. 

Fans at the event said they were amazed at the contestants’ performances, including Yasir Salem's 16.3-second burp, which netted him second place.

However, event organizers said Janus’s 18.1-second showstopper, which was captured on video and posted to YouTube, came after a previous a 14-second performance and now stands as "the greatest burp of all time." 
"Most striking to me is the emotional range of Janus' burp," Sebastian Rothschild, executive director of the World Burping Federation, said. "It is at once mournful and full of hope."

The World Burping Championship was sponsored by "Major League Eating: The Game," a gaming app now available on iTunes for iPhones and iPads.

The event focused exclusively on duration burping and did not include decibel burping, which is an entirely different discipline and which requires special permits, as the exercise frequently violates noise decibel restrictions for restaurants and other public places.  

The WBF, based out of Geneva, Switzerland, said it is planning a decibel-based event in a suitable location for fall 2012.

"The goal of the WBF is to restore burping to a place of respectability in Western culture, and to remove the stigma that has attached itself to this practice during the past millennium," Rothschild said.

During the competition, Janus shared his secret for world class burping, saying, "I drink a carbonated beverage, and afterwards regular water to compress the air inside my stomach and to press it out so that no air hides in the corners. In the future I hope to be able to squeeze my esophagus to better control the air-flow and to produce a pleasing musical note."