‘Shape of Water' triumphs at an Oscars full of change

Oldman, McDormand take top acting awards

LOS ANGELES - The 90th Academy Awards crowned Guillermo del Toro’s monster fable "The Shape of Water" best picture at an Oscars that confronted the post-Harvey Weinstein era and sought to pivot to a vision of a more inclusive movie business.

A sense of change was palpable at the ceremony Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, where winners made impassioned arguments for gender equality and diversity.

Guillermo del Toro’s monster fable "The Shape of Water," which came in with a leading 13 nods, took a leading four awards, including best production design, best score and best director for del Toro. He became the third Mexican-born filmmaker to win the award, joining his friends and countrymen Alejandro Inarritu and Alfonso Cuaron — who once were dubbed "the Three Amigos."

"The greatest thing that art does, and that our industry does, is erase the lines in the sand," said del Toro, alluding to his international career.

Jordan Peele won for his script to his horror sensation "Get Out," becoming the first African-American to win for best original screenplay. Peele said he stopped writing it "20 times," skeptical that it would ever get made.

"But I kept coming back to it because I knew if someone would let me make this movie, that people would hear it and people would see it," said Peele. "So I want to dedicate this to all the people who raised my voice and let me make this movie."

In a year lacking a clear front-runner the awards were spread around. Christopher Nolan’s World War II epic “Dunkirk” landed three awards, all for its technical craft: editing, sound editing and sound design.

Things went expected in the acting categories, where three widely admired veterans won their first Oscars. Gary Oldman won for his Winston Churchill in “Darkest Hour,” Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) took best supporting actress, and Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) won best supporting actor.

"I did it all by myself," deadpanned Janney, who added after a pause: "Nothing could be further from the truth."

Rockwell dedicated his award to his late friend and fellow New York actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who died in 2014. "For my buddy, Phil Hoffman," said Rockwell, raising his Oscar. Oldman thanked his "99-years young" mother. “Put the kettle on,” said Oldman. "I’m bringing Oscar."

But many of the show’s most powerful moments came in between the awards. Ashley Judd, Anabella Sciorra and Salma Hayek — who all made allegations of sexual misconduct against Weinstein — together assembled for a mid-show segment dedicated to the #MeToo movement that has followed the downfall of Weinstein, long an Oscar heavyweight. They were met by a standing ovation.

Host Jimmy Kimmel opened with a monologue that mixed Weinstein punchlines with earnest comments about reforming gender equality in Hollywood. And of course, Kimmel — returning to the scene of the flub — dove straight into material about last year’s infamous best-picture mix-up.

"I do want to mention, this year, when you hear your name called, don’t get up right away," said Kimmel. "Give us a minute."

But while Kimmel spent a few moments on the fiasco known as Envelopegate, he expended far more minutes frankly and soberly discussing the parade of sexual harassment allegations in the wake of the revelations regarding Weinstein. Kimmel cited the industry’s poor record for female directors and equal pay.

"We can’t let bad behavior slide anymore," said Kimmel. "The world is watching us."

Best Picture

  • “The Shape of Water”
  • “Dunkirk”
  • “Call Me by Your Name”
  • “Darkest Hour”
  • “Get Out”
  • “Lady Bird”
  • “Phantom Thread”
  • “The Post”
  • “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Lead Actress

  • Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
  • Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
  • Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
  • Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
  • Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Lead Actor

  • Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”
  • Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
  • Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
  • Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”


  • "The Shape of Water," Guillermo del Toro
  • “Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan
  • “Get Out,” Jordan Peele
  • “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
  • “Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson

Supporting Actress

  • Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”
  • Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
  • Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
  • Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
  • Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Supporting Actor

  • Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
  • Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
  • Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
  • Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
  • Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”

Original Screenplay

  • “Get Out,” Jordan Peele
  • “The Big Sick,” Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani
  • “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
  • “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor
  • “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Martin McDonagh

Adapted Screenplay

  • “Call Me by Your Name,” James Ivory
  • “The Disaster Artist,” Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber
  • “Logan,” Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green
  • “Molly’s Game,” Aaron Sorkin
  • “Mudbound,” Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

Animated Feature

  • “Coco,” Lee Unkrich, Darla K. Anderson
  • “The Boss Baby,” Tom McGrath, Ramsey Ann Naito
  • “The Breadwinner,” Nora Twomey, Anthony Leo
  • “Ferdinand,” Carlos Saldanha
  • “Loving Vincent,” Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Sean Bobbitt, Ivan Mactaggart, Hugh Welchman

Original Song

  • “Remember Me” from “Coco,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez
  • “Mighty River” from “Mudbound,” Mary J. Blige
  • “Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name,” Sufjan Stevens
  • “Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall,” Diane Warren, Common
  • “This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman,” Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

Best Documentary Feature

  • “Icarus,” Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan
  • “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” Steve James, Mark Mitten, Julie Goldman
  • “Faces Places,” JR, Agnès Varda, Rosalie Varda
  • “Last Men in Aleppo,” Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed, Soren Steen Jepersen
  • “Strong Island,” Yance Ford, Joslyn Barnes




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