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First of its kind effort focuses on prostate cancer

“We’re trying to recruit more African Americans, more men with a family history and veterans because they have a higher risk of prostate cancer and some of them may have a higher chance of having genes that match newly approved FDA therapies," said Dr. Channing Paller, a researcher with John Hopkins University.
“We’re trying to recruit more African Americans, more men with a family history and veterans because they have a higher risk of prostate cancer and some of them may have a higher chance of having genes that match newly approved FDA therapies," said Dr. Channing Paller, a researcher with John Hopkins University.

Researchers from John Hopkins University and the University of Washington are collaborating on a long-term observational study called Promise to learn how genetic differences can affect patient outcomes.

“We’re trying to recruit more African Americans, more men with a family history and veterans because they have a higher risk of prostate cancer and some of them may have a higher chance of having genes that match newly approved FDA therapies and also we have the opportunity to discover new treatments by working with men with different mutations or also differences in their DNA,” said Dr. Channing Paller, a researcher with John Hopkins.

Click here to learn more about the study

COVID vaccine and Alzheimer’s

And there’s growing evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine, and others, could provide some protective benefits against Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists don’t completely know why but the belief is that by generating a systemic immune response, vaccines may reduce inflammation in the brain. That inflammation can leads to neuron loss and cognitive decline.

An indirect effect may be that people who get vaccinated are more likely to get regular checkups, which can reveal potential underlying conditions that increase the risk of Alzheimer’s.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.