Early study investigates possible pathway for Alzheimer’s treatment

Scientists with the National Institutes of Health found that an anti-inflammatory drug protected lab mice against cognitive decline by reducing brain or neuro-inflammation.

BOCA RATON, Fla. – A recent study is providing new evidence about the link between brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists with the National Institutes of Health found that an anti-inflammatory drug protected lab mice against cognitive decline by reducing brain or neuro-inflammation.

Neurologist Dr. Richard Isaacson, who leads the Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention Program at Florida Atlantic University, said neuro-inflammation can occur decades before the symptoms of the disease are noticeable.

“The good news is it’s a new mechanism. We have drugs that target different aspects of Alzheimer’s, there’s the amyloid sticky protein that builds up there’s something called Tao, and then neuro-inflammation may be this kind of perfect target to slow down different types of Alzheimer’s disease. The problem with this study is it’s still pretty early, it’s in mice not in humans but I think it’s promising, we just have to do more research,” he said.

Isaacson said the mice in the study also showed improvement in areas of the brain responsible for memory, attention and motor function.

And Tuesday the Alzheimer’s Association released its 2022 report detailing the latest statistics and information on the disease, including specifics about the Sunshine State.

According to the report, 580,000 Floridians age 65 and older are living with Alzheimer’s

That number is expected to increase more than 24% to 720,000 by 2025.

With the second-highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s in the nation, members of the association said Florida remains at the forefront of the fight to eliminate all forms of dementia.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.