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Thousands turn out to Bernie Sanders' rallies

Vermont senator has plenty of fans in Gainesville, Kissimmee, Tampa

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MIAMI – Bernie Sanders has been busy in Florida. Thousands turned out to his rallies in Gainesville and Kissimmee Wednesday.

Some 8,000 showed up to his Thursday night rally. Ahead of the Tuesday primary, Sanders was appealing to pockets of Democrats and to students, who support his ideas on student. 

On education, Sanders said the nation is in need of skilled workers and in order to do that public colleges and universities need to be tuition free. And then he had a question: "Why then are we punishing people with decades of debt for getting an education?" 

The crowd at the Florida State Fairgrounds Expo Hall cheered and shouted: "Bernie, Bernie, Bernie, Bernie." Some were wearing "Bernie, Bernie"  and "Feel The Bern" T-shirts. There was a T-shirt of Hillary Clinton behind bars and a sign that read, "The Big House, not the White House."

Sanders said he was listening to African Americans and Latino community. He talked about the high population of African-Americans in prisons and the need for comprehensive immigration reform. He promised that if Congress didn't pass an immigration bill, he was going to do everything in his power to protect undocumented workers. 

The anti-Trump crowd went wild when Sanders said, "Love Trumps Hatred."

Some 5,600 turned out to the University of Florida, where he said, "if you guys come out to vote, we are going to pull off another upset."  About 5,200 turned out to his rally in Kissimmee, where he said, "If you come out and your friends and family and neighbors come out, we are going to win here in Florida." 

Florida was the epicenter of the presidential nominee race. Clinton also had a rally at the Rytz Ybor in Tampa. Republican candidates were having a debate in Coral Gables.

And Sanders, who said he was too tired to talk to a refugee, had to wake up early Friday. He had a rally scheduled for 10 a.m., Friday at the Duke Energy Performing Arts Center in Raleigh, North Carolina.  


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