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Selfie deaths happen most in this country

Study examines dangers of distraction

A woman takes a selfie at the edge of the Atlantic Ocean on Ipanema beach on June 2, 2017, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
A woman takes a selfie at the edge of the Atlantic Ocean on Ipanema beach on June 2, 2017, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

A new study looked at "selfie deaths," in which people have died while taking a photo of themselves. 

Worldwide, there were 127 reported selfie deaths in the 18 months between March 2014 and September 2016, The Telegraph reported. The study is titled "Me, Myself and My Killfie: Characterizing and Preventing Selfie Deaths."

More than 60 percent of those selfie deaths happened in India, according to the study conducted by Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania and Indraprastha Institute of Information Dehli. 

Selfie deaths are an issue in Mumbai. In the city last month, a 17-year-old student drowned after trying to take a selfie on the seafront. Priti Pise didn't notice a massive wave that approached her while she was composing the photo, and she was carried out to sea.

Also in Mumbai, Tarannum Ansari, 18, and Meenkashi Priay Rajesh, 17, drowned in separate incidents while taking selfies.

Selfie deaths in the city have pushed Mumbai police to consider designating 15 dangerous sites as "selfie-free points," The Times of India reported.

The Mumbai police urged citizens to prioritize safety over selfies. On June 28, they tweeted #SafeMonsoonTips: "Don't make 'taking a selfie' mean 'taking your own life'."

Last year, police used the hashtag #SafetyBeforeSelfie: "Selfies prohibited as no one wants you dead."