79ºF

Here is list of people charged in college admissions bribery scheme

Miami developer Robert Zangrillo faces charges in bribery scheme

PEMBROKE PARK, Fla. – Prosecutors say parents paid one of the cases cooperating witnesses about $25 million to bribe coaches and university administrators to get their children admitted to universities.

Along with wealthy parents and employees of the Edge College & Career Network, LLC and the Key Worldwide Foundation, prosecutors charged employees of Yale, Stanford, Berkeley, Georgetown, the University of Texas and the University of Southern California.

Here is a list of people prosecutors are charging in Florida: 

Robert Zangrillo: His case was in the U.S. Southern District of Florida and was remanded to the District of Massachusetts. Prosecutors are charging him by complaint with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud; conspiracy to commit money laundering. Zangrillo is the developer for the Miami City District in Little Haiti and Little River areas.

According to the criminal complaint, Zangrillo conspired to bribe athletic department officials at the University of Southern California to designate his daughter as an athletic recruit and paid to have Mikael Sanford to secretly take classes on her behalf. Investigators reported her initial application for admission to USC was rejected in 2017. 

Zangrillo appeared in court Tuesday afternoon. His bond was set at $500,000. 

 

Mark Riddell:   His case is in the U.S. Middle District of Florida. Prosecutors are charging him by information with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering. Riddell is accused of being paid to take tests in place of students from 2011 to February 2019, court records show

Here is the list of people prosecutors charged by information:

 

William "Rick" Singer: The head women's soccer coach at Yale University

Rudolph "Rudy" Meredith: Women's soccer coach at Yale University

Stanford University sailing coach John Vandemoer arrives at Boston Federal Court for an arraignment on March 12, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images

John Vandemoer: The sailing coach at Stanford University

 

Here is the list of people prosecutors charged by indictment:

Gordon Ernst: Head coach of men's and women's tennis at Georgetown University.  

William Ferguson: USC women's volleyball coach. 

Martin Fox: President of a private tennis academy in Houston. 

Donna Heinel: The senior associate athletic director at the University of Southern California. 

Laura Janke: USC assistant coach of women's soccer. 

Ali Khosroshahin: USC head coach of women's soccer. 

Steven Masera: Accountant and financial officer for the Edge College & Career Network, LLC and the Key Worldwide Foundation in Newport Beach, California. 

Jorge Salcedo: USC head coach of men's soccer.

Mikaela Sanford: Employee of the Edge College & Career Network, LLC and the Key Worldwide Foundation in Newport Beach, California.

David Sidoo:  A businessman and philanthropist from Vancouver who is accused of paying $200,000 to get other people to take his two sons' exams. According to the indictment, one of his sons was admitted to the University of California - Berkeley. 

Jovan Vavic: USC water polo coach. 

Niki Williams: Assistant teacher at a public school in Houston who served as a compensated standardized test administrator for the College Board and ACT, Inc. 

Igor Dvorskiy: Director of private school in Los Angeles and a compensated standardized test administrator for the College Board and ACT, Inc
 

Here is the list of people prosecutors charged of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud by complaint:

Gregory and Marcia Abbott: Their case is in the Southern District of New York. He is the founder of a packaging company for the food and beverage industry. Getting their daughter's ACT questions corrected was $50,000 and getting someone to take her SAT was $75,000, according to the complaint. 

Gamal Abdelaziz: The case is in the District of Nevada. He was a senior executive of a resort and casino operator in Macau, China.  He is accused of conspiring to bribe a senior associate athletic director at USC to designate his daughter as a USC basketball team recruit. He wired a $300,000 contribution to KWF, according to the complaint. 

Todd and Diane Blake: This case is in the Northern District of California. He is an entrepreneur and investor and she is an executive at a retail merchandising firm. They are accused of bribing a senior associate athletic director at USC to facilitate their daughter’s admission to USC as a purported volleyball recruit.

Jane Buckingham. File Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

Jane Buckingham: This case is in the Central District of California. She is the chief executive officer of a Los Angeles-based boutique marketing company.

Upon the request of the accused fraudsters, Jane Buckingham sent a writing sample by her son after saying "he has not great writing. I am gonna give you that, but I am going to, actually I'm bringing [him] to the doctor right now, so we will sit down in the waiting room and I will send it to you." according to the complaint.

Buckingham is accused of agreeing to make a purported donation of $50,000 in exchange for having someone take her son's ACT.

Gordon Caplan: This case is in the District of Connecticut. He is accused of participating in the college entrance exam scheme with hundreds of families as clients. 

Michael Center: This case is in the Western District of Texas. Tennis coach at the University of Texas. 

I-Hsin "Joey" Chen: His case is in the Central District of California. He is a provider of warhousing and related services for the shipping industry. Getting his son's ACT questions corrected was $75,000, according to the complaint. 

Gregory and Amy Colburn: This case is in the Northern District of California. He is a physician. The couple is accused of participating in the college entrance exam cheating scheme on behalf of their son. 

 

Robert Flaxman. File Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for LAAA

Robert Flaxman: This case is in the Central District of California. He is the president of a Los Angeles-based real estate development firm. He is accused of participating in both the college recruitment scheme and the college entrance exam scheme to get his son admitted to the University of San Diego and help his daughter with high ACT and SAT scores. 

 

Bella Loughlin, from left, Lori Loughlin, and Olivia Loughlin arrive at the Teen Choice Awards at the Galen Center

Mossimo Giannulli and Lori Loughlin: This case is in the Central District of California. He is a fashion designer and she is an actress. He is accused of paying $500,000 in exchange for having their two daughters designated as recruits to the USC crew team. 

Manuel and Elizabeth Henriquez: This case is in the Northern District of California. He is the founder of a Palo Alto-based finance company. They are accused of conspiring to bribe Georgetown University's tennis coach and paying for services to help both of their daughters. Their foundation paid $400,000 to KWF, according to the complaint. 

Douglas Hodge: This case is in the Central District of California. He is the former CEO of a large investment management company based in Newport Beach. He is accused of using bribery to facilitate the admission of two of his children to USC and to secure the admission of a third child to college.

1962: Actress Felicity Huffman, best known for her TV roles in "Sports Night" and "Desperate Housewives" and her Oscar-nominated performance in the movie "Transamerica," is born in Bedford, New York.

Felicity Huffman: This case is in the Central District of California. The actress is accused of parcipating in the college entrance exam cheating scheme on behalf of her two daughters. 

 

Agustin Huneeus received a fabricated athletic profile falsely identifying his daughter as a "3-year Varsity Letter winner" in water polo and "Team MVP 2017" with this photograph of another person, according to the complaint.

Agustin Huneeus: This case is in the Northern District of California. He is the owner of vineyards in Napa. He is accused of participating in both the college entrance exam cheating scheme and the college recruitment scheme for his daughter, including by conspiring to bribe Jovan Vavic, the USC water polo coach.

Bruce and Davina Isackson: This case is in the Northern District of California. He is the president of a real estate development firm. They are both accused of taking part in both the college recruitment scheme and the college entrance exam cheating scheme to secure their older daughter's admission to college as a recruited athlete.

Michelle Janavs. File Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images for Vogue

Michelle Janavs: This case is in the Central District of California. She the former executive at a large food manufacturer formerly owned by her family. She is accused of participating in both the college entrance exam scheme and the athletic recruitment scheme to help her daughter get admitted to USC as a beach volleyball recruit. 

Elisabeth Kimmel received a fake athletic profile falsely describing her son as an elite high school pole vaulter, and it included this photograph depicting another athlete, according to the complaint.

Elisabeth Kimmel:  Her case is in the District of Nevada. She is the owner of a media company. She is accused of participating in a college recruitment scheme by conspiring to bribe coaches to facilitate her daughter’s admission to Georgetown as a tennis recruit, and her son’s admission to USC as a track recruit.

Marjorie Klapper: This case is in the Northern District of California. She co-owns a jewelry business. She is accused of paying $15,000 in a college entrance exam cheating scheme on behalf of her son. 

Toby Macfarlane: This case is in the Southern District of California. The former senior executive at a title insurance company is accused of participating in a college recruitment scheme to help his son and daughter get admitted to USC as athletic recruits.

William McGlashan: His case is in the Northern District of California. He is a senior executive at a global private equity firm and lives in Mill Valley. He is accused of conspiring to bribe Donna Heinel, the senior associate athletic director at the University of Southern California to help his son. 

Marci Palatella: Her case is in the Northern District of California. She is the CEO of a liquor distribution company in Burlingame, California. She took part in both the college entrance exam cheating scheme and the athletic recruitment scheme, including by conspiring to bribe a USC coach to designate her son as a football recruit in order to facilitate his admission to USC. 

Peter Jan Sartorio: His case is in the Northern District of California. He is a packaged food entrepreneur who is accused of participating in the college entrance exam cheating scheme by paying $15,000 in cash to have someone correct his daughter's ACT.

Stephen Semprevivo: This case is in the Central District of California. He is an executive at a privately held provider of outsourced sales teams, based in Agoura Hills, California. He is accused of agreeing to bribe a coach to designate his son as a tennis recruit in order to facilitate his admission to Georgetown. 

Devin Sloane:  This case is in the Central District of California. He is the founder of a Los Angeles-based provider of drinking water and wastewater systems. He is accused of conspiring to bribe a USC coach to designate his son as a recruit to the USC men’s water polo team.

John Wilson: His case is in the Southern District of Texas. He is the CEO of a private equity and real estate firm. He is accused of conspiring to use bribes to get his son admitted to USC and his daughters admitted to Stanford and Harvard. 

Homayoun Zadeh: This case is in the Central District of California. He is an associate professor of dentistry. He is accused of conspiring to bribe a USC employee to designate his daughter as
a lacrosse recruit to facilitate her admission to USC. 
 


About the Author: