SHOW MORE 

Florida Legislature passes abortion parental consent bill

Beginning July 1st, pregnant teens will need their parents permission for an abortion in Florida under legislation.
Beginning July 1st, pregnant teens will need their parents permission for an abortion in Florida under legislation.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Girls under the age of 18 will have to get a parent's permission before having an abortion under a bill passed by the Florida Legislature on Thursday that Gov. Ron DeSantis is expected to sign.

The House voted 75-43 largely along party lines for the legislation that expands a current law that requires a girl's parents are notified before she can have an abortion. DeSantis asked lawmakers to send him the bill during his State of the State speech that kicked off the legislative session last month.

“What we are talking about is a child, and here were are talking about a child who is carrying a child,” said Republican Rep. Erin Grall, who sponsored the bill. “By including parents in this decision we empower the family. It is the critical backbone of our civilized society.”

The debate over the measure lasted nearly four hours.

The bill has a provision that will allow a girl to ask a judge for a waiver from the law in cases of abuse, incest or when involving a parent could cause more harm than allowing the procedure. But opponents argued that asking minors to negotiate the legal system when they are already scared and ashamed could drive them to illegal abortions.

“We are codifying into law that someone else can force a girl to have a child she does not want to have,” Democratic Rep. Susan Valdes said. “I worry that many girls will, when deprived access to a safe termination of pregnancy, take the risks of finding an unsafe, dangerous and untested method of terminating their pregnancies.”

She said that might include searching the internet for “mystery concoctions” in an attempt to end the pregnancy.

Democrats also said some girls might risk being thrown out of their homes or beaten if they tell their parents they're pregnant. But Grall said that just because there are some bad parents, it doesn't mean the rights of others to be part of the decision should be taken away.