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Corrective lenses ease problems associated with misaligned eyes

Up to 40% of Americans are near-sighted and another 60% are far-sighted, but there’s another vision issue that can be the source of other health complaints which often goes undiagnosed.
Up to 40% of Americans are near-sighted and another 60% are far-sighted, but there’s another vision issue that can be the source of other health complaints which often goes undiagnosed.

PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. – Up to 40% of Americans are near-sighted and another 60% are far-sighted, but there’s another vision issue that can be the source of other health complaints which often goes undiagnosed.

Seeing clearly, up close and far away, is the focus of annual eye exams.

“And you can test it in your left eye and your right eye, and we aim for 20/20, but what we’re not always addressing is not just how you’re seeing, but how your eyes are aligned and how they’re working together,” said optometrist Dr. Amanda Nanasy with the Eye Center in Pembroke Pines.

Nanasy said eye alignment is particularly critical when it comes to computer use, which is something most of people engage in every day.

“When you’re put in a situation where your eyes have to be perfectly aligned like this all day and not even in one spot, doing this, looking from one screen to the other, that little change, that misalignment can cause all kinds of problems for our patients,” Nanasy said.

Headaches, eye strain, fatigue, blurred vision, neck and shoulder pain, dizziness, dry eye and light sensitivity are all associated with misaligned eyes.

A diagnostic test can determine if someone’s eyes are misaligned, making them potential candidates for something called Neurolens.

The Neurolens can be made using your existing vision prescription, or alone by itself, and it corrects eye alignment with a contoured prism.

“And what the prism does is it allows that image to come to our eyes rather than our eyes having to constantly go to the image,” Nanasy said.

She said the Neurolens is helping her exceed patient expectations.

“They expect me to be able to make them see more clearly, but not feel better and improve their overall quality of life with just a  pair of glasses,” Nanasy said.

While the lenses are not yet covered by vision insurance plans, patients can get a full refund for the cost if they don’t experience symptom relief.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.