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Boy Scouts submit reorganization plan to bankruptcy court

FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2020, file photo, Boy Scouts of America uniforms are displayed in the retail store at the headquarters for the French Creek Council of the Boy Scouts of America in Summit Township, Pa.   Nine sex-abuse lawsuits were filed Tuesday, May 19 2020, in upstate New York against three Boy Scout local councils, signaling an escalation of efforts to pressure councils nationwide to pay a big share of an eventual settlement in the Scouts bankruptcy proceedings. The lawsuits were filed shortly after an easing of coronavirus lockdown rules enabled courts in some parts of New York to resume the handling of civil cases.  (Christopher Millette/Erie Times-News via AP, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2020, file photo, Boy Scouts of America uniforms are displayed in the retail store at the headquarters for the French Creek Council of the Boy Scouts of America in Summit Township, Pa. Nine sex-abuse lawsuits were filed Tuesday, May 19 2020, in upstate New York against three Boy Scout local councils, signaling an escalation of efforts to pressure councils nationwide to pay a big share of an eventual settlement in the Scouts bankruptcy proceedings. The lawsuits were filed shortly after an easing of coronavirus lockdown rules enabled courts in some parts of New York to resume the handling of civil cases. (Christopher Millette/Erie Times-News via AP, File)

DOVER, Del. – The Boy Scouts of America has submitted a bankruptcy reorganization plan that envisions continued operations of its local troops and national adventure camps but leaves many unanswered questions about resolving tens of thousands of sexual abuse claims by former Boy Scouts.

The plan was filed Monday, even though the BSA remains in intense negotiations with insurers over sexual abuse claims and with the official committee representing abuse victims.

The BSA says the plan demonstrates progress as it works to compensate abuse victims and address finances so it can continue operating.

An attorney for hundreds of former Scouts calls the plan woefully inadequate.