Advocates, experts warn against polling place reductions

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FILE-In this Tuesday, June 23, 2020 file photo, poll workers instruct a voter on where to go to fill out their ballot during the Kentucky primary at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Ky. There was only one polling place open on election day this week in Louisville, Kentucky, and voting went relatively smoothly compared to other recent primaries amid the global pandemic. Does that mean other cities should consider the same in November? (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – With only one polling place open on election day this week in Louisville, Kentucky, voting went relatively smoothly compared with other recent primaries held amid the global pandemic. Does that mean other cities should consider the same in November?

Voting rights groups say no. They caution that just because Kentucky's largest city didn’t have excessively long lines for the primary doesn’t mean other cities should scale back polling locations -- even if they expand access to absentee ballots — and contend that, among other reasons, more polling places are needed to handle higher turnout likely in the fall general election.

“Offering just one site on election day presumes we have reached everyone, and we don’t have to work as hard on election day, and that thinking is dangerous,” said Kristen Clarke, executive director for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “In the primaries, we’re just getting a taste of what turnout will look like in November.”

Kentucky’s top election official, Republican Secretary of State Michael Adams, agrees. Adams said he advised counties not to reduce polling places to the extent they did in the primary, but those decisions were made by local officials and the state Board of Elections.

“I’m glad it went off without a hitch, but the fact is we’re going to have twice the turnout in November that we had in June, or more,” Adams said in an interview Thursday. “We just cannot have so few voting locations.”

Local election officials have been dealing with unprecedented voting disruptions caused by the pandemic, as poll workers have dropped out over fears of catching the virus and locations like senior living communities and nursing homes have said they no longer want to serve as polling places.

The shortages prompted local officials to consolidate polling places across the country for the primaries. In recent months, voters saw protracted wait times in places including Atlanta, Milwaukee and Las Vegas. In Milwaukee, officials closed all but five of the city’s 180 polling places, resulting in people standing in line for two hours.

“In the best of times, really long lines are deterring and disenfranchising. In the time of the coronavirus, long lines can be deadly,” said Myrna Perez, director of the voting rights and elections program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law.