QAnon-supporting candidate unrepentant despite GOP criticism

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Supporters take photos with construction executive Marjorie Taylor Greene, background right, late Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, in Rome, Ga. Greene, criticized for promoting racist videos and adamantly supporting the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, won the GOP nomination for northwest Georgia's 14th Congressional District. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

ATLANTA – Political newcomer Marjorie Taylor Greene was mocked as a supporter of QAnon conspiracies and denounced for videos deemed racist even by fellow Republicans who withdrew endorsements and declared her unfit for Congress.

The businesswoman from northern Georgia had a blunt message for her critics as she coasted to victory in a Republican primary runoff election that should put her on an easy path to winning an open U.S. House seat: “I will not apologize.”

“If Republicans want to win in 2020, they need to listen the message that I’m speaking," Greene told cheering supporters in a victory speech that railed against “spineless Republicans” and “anti-American leftists.” Targeting Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, she said: “We’re going to kick that b - - - - out of Congress.”.

Outspoken and unrepentant, Greene is proving there's a place among Republicans even for candidates whose views many consider extreme.

In one online video, Greene embraced QAnon, a far-right conspiracy theory centered on the baseless belief that President Donald Trump is waging a secret campaign against enemies in the “deep state” and a child sex trafficking ring run by satanic pedophiles and cannibals. In other videos, she said Black and Hispanic men are being held back by “gangs and dealing drugs,” alleged an “Islamic invasion” of government offices and accused Jewish billionaire George Soros of collaborating with Nazis.

“I’m a very controversial person, but I even cringed at some of the things that she said,” said Debbie Dooley, president of the Atlanta tea party and a Republican activist.

Unofficial election returns showed Greene winning by a wide margin in her Tuesday primary runoff with John Cowan — a neurosurgeon endorsed by several Georgia GOP congressmen, some who openly denounced Greene.

In Washington, Trump came out in support of Greene on Wednesday, all but assuring she would be welcome by Republicans in Congress, despite splinters in the party over her candidacy.