Delta suspends codesharing with Russia’s Aeroflot carrier

Delta Air Lines plane leaves the gate, Monday, July 12, 2021, at Logan International Airport in Boston. Delta Air Lines has requested that the U.S. Department of Justice put any person convicted of a disruption on board a flight to the national no fly list. In a letter to the Justice Department Attorney General Merrick Garland dated Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022, Delta CEO Ed Bastian said there should be zero tolerance for any behavior that affects flight safety. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) (Michael Dwyer, Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

ATLANTA – Delta Air Lines has suspended its codesharing partnership with Russian national airline Aeroflot following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine — and some Baltic and European nations announced the closure of their airspace to Russian carriers.

Atlanta-based Delta on Friday said its decision put a hold on the codesharing system allowing Delta and Aeroflot customers to book flights on both airlines.

“We have removed our code from Aeroflot-operated services beyond Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport and removed Aeroflot’s code from Delta-operated services from Los Angeles and New York-JFK. Accommodations will be made for customers affected by these changes,” Delta said in a statement, adding that it does not operate flights to Ukraine or Russia.

The codesharing suspension came after Britain on Thursday banned Aeroflot from flying into the country.

Aeroflot didn’t immediately respond Saturday to an email seeking comment that was sent to its communications department.

On Saturday, the Baltic nations of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania announced that they will close their airspace to Russian airlines. Slovenia and the Czech Republic also did so because of the invasion of Ukraine.

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas tweeted that Western nations should isolate Russia economically and politically, saying “there is no place for planes of the aggressor state in democratic skies.”

Slovenia’s government said its ban applies to all aircraft registered in Russia and operators based in Russia and licensed by a competent Russian authority.

The Czech Republic’s decision means that the country is “stepping up our measures against the Russian aggression in Ukraine,” said Czech Transport Minister Martin Kupka.