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The Royal wedding florist: Philippa Craddock

Self-taught florist to use seasonal flowers for down-to-earth designs

Florist Philippa Craddock, who has been chosen to create the floral displays for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, is pictured in her studio on March 29, 2018, in London.
Florist Philippa Craddock, who has been chosen to create the floral displays for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, is pictured in her studio on March 29, 2018, in London. (Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

London florist Philippa Craddock will be using white garden roses, foxgloves and peonies to decorate St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle for the royal wedding of the year.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are allowing Craddock to use seasonal flowers and plants -- such as branches of beech, birch and hornbeam -- from the gardens of the Crown Estate and Windsor Great Park.

Aside from being the preferred supplier to the Kensington Palace, Banqueting House and Hampton Court Palace, Craddock's list of prominent clientele also includes the houses of Alexander McQueen, Christian Dior, Hermes and Jo Malone.

Craddock, a self-taught florist with a down to earth approach, opened her Central London business in 2009. She also has a studio in Fulham and a shop in Selfridges' Foodhall.

Craddock advertises her preference for fair-trade farms and avoidance of foam and plastic, and also makes regular donations to Drop4Drop, a charity with water well projects in India, Uganda, Mozambique and the Philippines.

After the wedding, the Kesington Palace announced the flowers will be distributed to local charities. Craddock usually donates them to Floral Angels, a charity that distributes the flowers to hospices and charities in London. 

 

 

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Berries and roses

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Roll on 2017..... #exciting #flowers #florists #newyear

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