Flag ban fallout: Now comes the tricky part for NASCAR

Reese Witherspoon tweeted a high-five emoji for her A-list stamp of approval that NASCAR banned the Confederate flag.

NASCAR's decision to ban the Confederate flag from its races and venues grabbed headlines and stars like Witherspoon and New Orleans Saints running back Alvin Kamara were quick to praise the stock car series for ridding itself of a symbol long associated with slavery and racism.

Kamara tweeted as the laps ticked off -- he requested NASCAR send him a car so he can take a spin -- and the sport suddenly had a slew of new, energized fans.

Now comes the tricky part.

In a matter of days, NASCAR will be faced with a daunting question: How to enforce the ban at its sprawling, rowdy tracks once fans are allowed back in and campers start setting up their RVs for race weekends? Approximately 1,000 members of the military will be allowed into Sunday's race near Miami and become the first fans at a NASCAR event since the pandemic shut down sports in March.

The enforcement question is much more likely to be an issue when the series holds races June 20-21 at Talladega, Alabama, where up to 5,000 fans are expected to be allowed in. Flags are a common sight at the superspeedway in the heart of NASCAR's Southern base. NASCAR will work to develop protocols around enforcement, though it's not known where the ban ends? Will security be tasked with policing every Rebel flag string bikini or scrape off all the bumper stickers?

Take off that shirt, or else!

Or else, what?