MIAMI -

Two lawsuits were filed in connection with the bus crash at Miami International Airport that killed two people and injured several others.

The lawsuit filed in Miami-Dade on Thursday states that Miriam Machado was seriously injured when the bus crashed into an overpass at the arrivals terminal. A wrongful death lawsuit was also filed by the family of Francisco Urena, who was killed in the crash.

Police said the driver was lost when he crashed. Machado and Urena were among 32 Jehovah's Witnesses heading to a convention in West Palm Beach. One other person was killed in the crash.

"It is shocking that the driver could have collided with a clearly-marked concrete overpass in broad daylight, with multiple signs warning high vehicles away from the area," Lewis S. 'Mike' Eidson, counsel for Urena’s family, said in a news release. "Bus companies must do more to ensure that their drivers are properly trained and understand traffic signs to prevent such avoidable accidents. Urena was a dedicated father and husband and this is an outrageous tragedy of immense proportions and should never happen again.”

Attorneys representing Machado said she remains in the intensive care unit at Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center. Families members said she is in critical condition, and suffered serious injuries to her face, ribs, spine and spleen.

“This story is tragic and mind-boggling,” Stephen F. Rossman, who is representing Machado, said in a news release. “This is a clear case of driver inattentiveness. Issues of lack of qualifications, inadequacy of training and insufficient trip planning are common errors we see in these large commercial vehicle crashes.”

Attorneys also released a picture of Machado before the crash, which is below.

No charges have been filed against the driver. Investigators are trying to determine why he did not see the signs that warned him over the height of the overpass.

Three passengers remain in stable condition and one other is in critical condition at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Doctors there credited increased staffing at the Ryder Trauma Center with helping them save lives following the crash.