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10 most memorable moments in history of South Florida Super Bowls

Super Bowl LIV will be 11th time South Florida has been setting of NFL championship game

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Steve Young runs over San Diego Chargers cornerbacke Darrien Gordon for the first down in the first quarter of Super Bowl XXIX at Joe Robbie Stadium, Jan. 29, 1995.
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Steve Young runs over San Diego Chargers cornerbacke Darrien Gordon for the first down in the first quarter of Super Bowl XXIX at Joe Robbie Stadium, Jan. 29, 1995. (AP Photo)

As South Florida prepares to host its record-11th Super Bowl, here’s a look back at the most memorable moments from the previous 10 games.


‘Broadway Joe’ delivers on guarantee, stunning Baltimore and America

Super Bowl III | Miami Orange Bowl | Jan. 12, 1969

New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath talks with reporters as he rests on a training table in the team's dressing room the morning after the Jets defeated the Baltimore Colts 16-7 in Super Bowl III at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 13, 1969, in Miami.
New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath talks with reporters as he rests on a training table in the team's dressing room the morning after the Jets defeated the Baltimore Colts 16-7 in Super Bowl III at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 13, 1969, in Miami. (AP Photo)

Days before the game, New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath guaranteed a victory. He kept his word. Namath led the Jets to a stunning victory over the Don Shula-coached Colts, shocking Baltimore fans and the country. Baltimore had been an 18-point favorite entering the game but trailed 16-0 in the fourth quarter before backup quarterback Johnny Unitas took over for an ineffective Earl Morrall and led the Colts to a late score in the final minutes. Namath cemented his nickname as “Broadway Joe,” completing 17 of 28 passes for 206 yards on his way to being named Super Bowl MVP.

Final Score: New York Jets 16, Baltimore Colts 7


John Elway goes out a champion

Super Bowl XXXIII | Pro Player Stadium | Jan. 31, 1999

Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway celebrates a fourth-quarter touchdown against the Atlanta Falcons during Super Bowl XXXIII at Pro Player Stadium, Jan. 31, 1999.
Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway celebrates a fourth-quarter touchdown against the Atlanta Falcons during Super Bowl XXXIII at Pro Player Stadium, Jan. 31, 1999. (AP Photo)

At 39 years old, John Elway became the oldest player, at the time, to be named Super Bowl MVP. The Denver Broncos quarterback capped his second straight Super Bowl championship by completing 18 of 29 passes for 336 yards and two total touchdowns, including a 3-yard run in the fourth quarter to give his team a 31-6 lead. It was the final game of Elway’s career before he announced his retirement after 16 seasons.

Final score: Denver Broncos 34, Atlanta Falcons 19


‘Look, isn’t that John Candy?’

Super Bowl XXIII | Joe Robbie Stadium | Jan. 22, 1989

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana prepares to throw the football as Cincinnati Bengals Jim Skow closes in during the first quarter of Super Bowl XXIII at Joe Robbie Stadium, Jan. 22, 1989.
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana prepares to throw the football as Cincinnati Bengals Jim Skow closes in during the first quarter of Super Bowl XXIII at Joe Robbie Stadium, Jan. 22, 1989. (AP Photo)

With San Francisco trailing Cincinnati 16-13 with 3:10 left in the game, 49ers quarterback Joe Montana broke from the huddle, turned to offensive tackle Harris Barton and pointed to a familiar face in the stands. “Look, isn’t that John Candy?” Montana asked. In the face of adversity, Montana calmed his teammates and then orchestrated a 92-yard, game-winning touchdown drive. “Everybody kind of smiled, and even Harris relaxed, and then we all concentrated on the job we had to do.”

Final Score: San Francisco 49ers 20, Cincinnati Bengals 16


The Who helps the Saints win a Super Bowl

Super Bowl XLIV | Sun Life Stadium | Feb. 7, 2010

New Orleans Saints punter Thomas Morstead reacts as an official signals that the Saints will have possession of the football after an onside kick to start the second half of Super Bowl XLIV at Sun Life Stadium, Feb. 7, 2010, in Miami Gardens, Florida.
New Orleans Saints punter Thomas Morstead reacts as an official signals that the Saints will have possession of the football after an onside kick to start the second half of Super Bowl XLIV at Sun Life Stadium, Feb. 7, 2010, in Miami Gardens, Florida. (AP Photo)

With his team trailing 10-6 at halftime, New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton made a gutsy gamble to call an onside kick after the break. Payton said he made the decision during the Who’s 35-minute-long halftime show, “somewhere between ‘Teenage Wasteland’ (the song’s actual title is ‘Baba O’Riley’) and ‘Pinball Wizard.’” The play, simply called “Ambush,” worked. Rookie punter Thomas Morstead had practiced the play all week, so he wasn’t worried. “I was terrified,” he recalled. The Saints took over on the 42-yard line and scored a touchdown to take their first lead of the game.

Final Score: New Orleans Saints 31, Indianapolis Colts 17


Hello Miami, goodbye Green Bay

Super Bowl II | Miami Orange Bowl | Jan. 14, 1968

Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi is carried off the field after his team defeated the Oakland Raiders 33-14 in Super Bowl II at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 14, 1968, in Miami.
Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi is carried off the field after his team defeated the Oakland Raiders 33-14 in Super Bowl II at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 14, 1968, in Miami. (AP Photo)

Miami’s first Super Bowl was legendary Green Bay head coach Vince Lombardi’s last. After leading the Packers to their second consecutive Super Bowl win, Lombardi stepped down but remained the team’s general manager. Lombardi would return for one last hurrah on the sideline, coaching the Washington Redskins in 1969. He died a year later. The Super Bowl championship trophy is now named in his honor.

Final Score: Green Bay Packers 33, Oakland Raiders 14


Graceful like a Lynn Swann

Super Bowl X | Miami Orange Bowl | Jan. 18, 1976

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Lynn Swann dives as he catches a pass from quarterback Terry Bradshaw during Super Bowl X at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 18, 1976, in Miami.
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Lynn Swann dives as he catches a pass from quarterback Terry Bradshaw during Super Bowl X at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 18, 1976, in Miami. (AP Photo)

Lynn Swann became the first wide receiver to be named Super Bowl MVP. Despite hauling in just four catches, the Pittsburgh Steelers star amassed 161 yards and a touchdown. Two of those catches earned nicknames -- the “levitating leap” and the “kangaroo catch.” His 64-yard touchdown reception with 3:02 left in the game gave Pittsburgh a 21-10 lead.

Final Score: Pittsburgh Steelers 21, Dallas Cowboys 17


Forever Young

Super Bowl XXIX | Joe Robbie Stadium | Jan. 29, 1995

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Steve Young runs a victory lap after his team beat the San Diego Chargers in Super Bowl XXIX, Jan. 29, 1995, at Joe Robbie Stadium.
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Steve Young runs a victory lap after his team beat the San Diego Chargers in Super Bowl XXIX, Jan. 29, 1995, at Joe Robbie Stadium. (AP Photo)

After the 49ers won four Super Bowls behind the arm of quarterback Joe Montana, Super Bowl XXIX signaled the changing of the guard at arguably the most important position on the field. Steve Young, who was the backup to Montana during two of those championship seasons, threw for a Super Bowl-record six touchdown passes to defeat San Diego. The Super Bowl MVP was 24-of-36 for 325 yards without an interception.

Final Score: San Francisco 49ers 49, San Diego Chargers 26


Champion at last

Super Bowl XLI | Dolphin Stadium | Feb. 4, 2007

Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy hugs quarterback Peyton Manning after their team's 29-17 win over the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI at Dolphin Stadium, Feb. 4, 2007, in Miami Gardens, Florida.
Indianapolis Colts coach Tony Dungy hugs quarterback Peyton Manning after their team's 29-17 win over the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI at Dolphin Stadium, Feb. 4, 2007, in Miami Gardens, Florida. (AP Photo)

Peyton Manning finally did it. The No. 1 overall pick in the 1998 NFL Draft overcame rainy conditions and a 14-6 first-quarter deficit to deliver Indianapolis its first Super Bowl championship since the Colts bolted from Baltimore in 1984. The Super Bowl MVP finished 25-of-38 for 247 yards and a touchdown.

Final Score: Indianapolis Colts 29, Chicago Bears 17


‘Bless his heart’

Super Bowl XIII | Miami Orange Bowl | Jan. 21, 1979

Dallas Cowboys tight end Jackie Smith is on the ground after missing a pass in the end zone from Roger Staubach in the third quarter of Super Bowl XIII against the Pittsburgh Steelers at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 22, 1979, in Miami. The catch would have tied the game. The Steelers won 35-31.
Dallas Cowboys tight end Jackie Smith is on the ground after missing a pass in the end zone from Roger Staubach in the third quarter of Super Bowl XIII against the Pittsburgh Steelers at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 22, 1979, in Miami. The catch would have tied the game. The Steelers won 35-31. (AP Photo)

Dallas tight end Jackie Smith will perhaps best be remembered for dropping what would have been a touchdown catch in the end zone. Trailing the Steelers 21-14 in the third quarter, Dallas quarterback Roger Staubach threw a third-down pass to Smith, who was alone in the end zone, but he dropped the football and the Cowboys had to settle for a field goal. “Bless his heart, he’s got to be the sickest man in America,” Cowboys radio announcer Verne Lundquist said after the dropped pass. The Cowboys lost and Smith played his final game in the NFL.

Final Score: Pittsburgh Steelers 35, Dallas Cowboys 31


Super Bowl? More like ‘Stupor Bowl’

Super Bowl V | Miami Orange Bowl | Jan. 17, 1971

A trio of Dallas Cowboys gang tackle Baltimore Colts linebacker Mike Curtis following his interception late in the fourth quarter of Super Bowl V at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 18, 1971, in Miami. The interception set up the game-winning field goal in the final seconds. Tackling Curtis are Jethro Pugh (75), Bob Lilly (74) and Chuck Howley (54).
A trio of Dallas Cowboys gang tackle Baltimore Colts linebacker Mike Curtis following his interception late in the fourth quarter of Super Bowl V at the Orange Bowl, Jan. 18, 1971, in Miami. The interception set up the game-winning field goal in the final seconds. Tackling Curtis are Jethro Pugh (75), Bob Lilly (74) and Chuck Howley (54). (AP Photo)

This is widely considered to be the worst Super Bowl ever played. It’s frequently referred to as the “Stupor Bowl” because of all the follies, which included a missed extra-point attempt, penalties, turnovers and officiating miscues. Baltimore and Dallas combined for a Super Bowl-record 11 turnovers, including five in the final 15 minutes. Dallas linebacker Chuck Howley was the game’s MVP, marking the only occasion in Super Bowl history that someone from the losing team earned the top individual honor.

Final Score: Baltimore Colts 16, Dallas Cowboys 13