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This Week in South Florida: Cassandra Suprin

Despite the focus on the mass expulsions of Haitians from that now-empty border encampment in Del Rio, Texas, the majority of the people there are now in the U.S. and beginning their asylum claim processes.
Despite the focus on the mass expulsions of Haitians from that now-empty border encampment in Del Rio, Texas, the majority of the people there are now in the U.S. and beginning their asylum claim processes.

PEMBROKE PARK, Fla. – Despite the focus on the mass expulsions of Haitians from that now-empty border encampment in Del Rio, Texas, the majority of the people there are now in the U.S. and beginning their asylum claim processes.

Countless migrants will be doing that while living with relatives or sponsors in South Florida.

Local 10 News spoke with some of those families last week. Their experiences shed some light on the questions and confusion in the process.

They have similar accounts of the horrors and hardships they went through when traveling to the border, but different experiences as they begin the asylum process, a process tangled in political fingerpainting, bureaucratic delays and legitimate questions.

Cassandra Suprin, an attorney with Americans for Immigrant Justice in Miami, joined This Week in South Florida to answer some of those questions.

Her conversation with TWISF hosts Michael Putney and Glenna Milberg can be seen at the top of this page.


About the Authors:

Michael Putney came to Local 10 in 1989 to become senior political reporter and host of "This Week In South Florida with Michael Putney." He is Local 10's senior political reporter. 

Glenna Milberg joined Local 10 News in September 1999 to report on South Florida's top stories and community issues. She also serves as co-host on Local 10's public affairs broadcast, "This Week in South Florida."