NOAA expects 6 to 10 hurricanes during above average season

MIAMI – Meteorologists expect the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, from June 1 to Nov. 30, to be the seventh consecutive season above average.

There will be 14 to 21 named storms including 6 to 10 hurricanes and three to six of those hurricanes will be a Category 3 or higher, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s official forecast released on Tuesday.

Last year, there were 21 named storms, including seven hurricanes and four were a Category 3 or higher. The experts attribute this year’s activity to the ongoing La Niña and to the above-average sea surface temperatures.

“Early preparation and understanding your risk is key to being hurricane resilient and climate-ready,” Secretary of Commerce Gina M. Raimondo said.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is working with NOAA to prepare for the risks.

Rick Spinrad, the NOAA administrator, and Deanne Criswell, the FEMA administrator, met with the experts at the New York City Emergency Management Department’s Emergency Operations Center in Brooklyn.

“It’s important for everyone to understand their risk and take proactive steps to get ready now,” Criswell said.

Christina Farrell, NYC Emergency Management Department’s first deputy commissioner, and Matthew Rosencrans, the lead hurricane season outlook forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, were also at the meeting.

For more information, visit NOAA’s National Weather Service page and the Weather Authority’s page.

6 p.m. report

Weather Authority

Meteorologists expect the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, from June 1 to Nov. 30, to be the seventh consecutive season above average.
Meteorologists expect the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, from June 1 to Nov. 30, to be the seventh consecutive season above average.

Interactive graphic: Collecting data

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Prepare your hurricane season kit

  • Three days of non-perishable food and a can opener.
  • Three days of water, a cooler and ice packs.
  • Prescription medication and a first-aid kit
  • Personal hygiene items and sanitation items
  • Flashlights with extra batteries
  • Battery-operated radio with extra batteries.
  • Waterproof container with cash and important documents

Prepare your home

  • Cover all of your windows with shutters or wood.
  • Secure straps or clips to securely fasten your roof to the structure of your home.
  • Make sure all trees and shrubs are trimmed and clear rain gutters.
  • Reinforce your garage doors.
  • Bring in all outdoor furniture, garbage cans, decorations, and anything else that is not tied down.
  • If winds become strong, stay away from windows and doors and close, secure, and brace internal doors.

Source: State of Florida

This is a developing story. Executive Producer Natalie Morera contributed to this report.


About the Authors:

Betty Davis is the chief certified meteorologist for Local 10. She provides weather forecasts for South Florida Monday-Friday during the 4, 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts. 

Luke Dorris joined the Local 10 Weather Authority just in time for Hurricane Irma in 2017.