80ºF

Burt Reynolds leaves son out of will, but it's not what it seems

'Smokey and the Bandit' actor's will says trust established for Quentin Reynolds

Actor Burt Reynolds and his son Quinton arrive at the premiere of "The Longest Yard" on May 19, 2005, in Los Angeles.
Actor Burt Reynolds and his son Quinton arrive at the premiere of "The Longest Yard" on May 19, 2005, in Los Angeles. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

PEMBROKE PARK, Fla. – "Smokey and the Bandit" star Burt Reynolds, who died earlier this month in South Florida, left his adult son out of his will, but not because he wanted to disinherit him.

The will, filed in Martin County in 2011, lists his niece, and not 30-year-old adopted son Quinton Reynolds, as the trustee.

"I intentionally omit him from this, my last will and testament, as I have provided for him during my lifetime in my declaration of trust," the late Reynolds wrote in his will.

Instead, the will states that Reynolds established a trust for Quinton.

Reynolds and ex-wife Loni Anderson adopted Quinton before they split up in 1993 amid a bitter and highly publicized divorce.

Full Screen
1 / 27

Before he was an actor, Burt Reynolds was a running back for the Florida State University football team.

Once Hollywood's No. 1 box-office draw, Reynolds spent five years (1978 to 1982) attracting the world's audiences to movie theaters.

Reynolds grew up in Palm Beach County, lived in Tequesta and taught acting classes at his Burt Reynolds Institute for Film & Television in North Palm Beach just days before his Sept. 6 death at Jupiter Medical Center.

A Florida death certificate revealed Reynolds was cremated at the Gold Coast Crematory in Fort Lauderdale.