Study shows sperm decline in marijuana smokers

Tulane University scientists also found that pot smokers had greater motility of sperm, meaning it moved more quickly. “However, despite that, the negative changes were much more significant than any positive changes that were found in these results,” said Dr. Armando Hernandez-Rey, a fertility specialist with Conceptions Florida in Coral Gables.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. – A recent study in the United States supports the findings from research in China that found past and present male marijuana smokers had a decline in sperm quality compared to non-smokers.

Scientists from Tulane University also found that smokers had greater motility of sperm, meaning it moved more quickly.

“The negative results, meaning low volume in semen and decrease in the quality of sperm, is a negative for fertility however what we did see in this study which we did not see in previous studies is there is an increase in the motility which in theory enhances fertility which is something we want to see,” said Dr. Armando Hernandez-Rey, a fertility specialist with Conceptions Florida in Coral Gables. “However, despite that, the negative changes were much more significant than any positive changes that were found in these results.”

Hernandez-Rey said it’s still not clear what duration of pot smoking can impact the changes in sperm or whether the same impact could occur among those who use edibles and other forms of cannabis.

Marijuana use has increased an estimated 60% worldwide in the past decade.

And a study of patients undergoing a procedure to treat narrowing of the coronary arteries found that recent marijuana smoking tended to create different complications for these patients compared to non-users.

In a study by Blue Cross Blue Shield in Michigan, marijuana users experienced a higher risk of bleeding and stroke but a lower risk of acute kidney injury.

Because of conflicting data surrounded the exact effect of marijuana on blood clotting, researchers say bleeding avoidance strategies, such as approach surgery through a radial artery, should be adopted.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.