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Skin cancer can be treated without surgery

Dr. Paul Benedetto with the Cleveland Clinic Weston said an injection of a chemotherapy drug, coated in nanoparticles, could be a promising option for some skin cancer patients.

WESTON, Fla. – Researchers are uncovering a way to treat skin cancer without invasive surgery.

Dr. Paul Benedetto with the Cleveland Clinic Weston said an injection of a chemotherapy drug, coated in nanoparticles, could be a promising option for some skin cancer patients.

“So as opposed to cutting out a skin cancer they are hopeful that maybe they can inject medicine into the tumor and the whole part of the nanotechnology is that it can make the medicine stay in place,” he said.

Benedetto said keeping the active drug in place greatly reduces the potential for toxicity to other tissues.

The incidence of skin cancer, both melanoma and non-melanoma, is on the rise.

More people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined.

Brain injury study

Canadian researchers have found that measuring cerebral blood flow among college athletes with a history of concussion is a possible predictor of future brain injury.

The study found that players with sharper declines in cerebral blood flow had subtle and chronic changes in the brain, even though outwardly there was no difference in symptoms or recovery time compared to players with no history of concussion.

This study and others continue to raise concern about the cumulative effects of repeated head injuries later in life.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.