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Is the virtual world putting people in danger?

Police advise to never give personal info to someone met online

There are plenty of apps that make dating easy, but the more comfortable people become in the virtual world, police say, the more they can put themselves and their homes at risk.
There are plenty of apps that make dating easy, but the more comfortable people become in the virtual world, police say, the more they can put themselves and their homes at risk.

MIAMI – Apps like Tinder and Grindr make dating -- or just hooking up -- very easy. But the more comfortable people are in the virtual world, police say the more they can put themselves, and their homes, at risk.

Last month, Miami police said a man decided to meet someone he was chatting with on the app Jack'd. But instead of meeting out somewhere, he invited his would-be date to his house. The meeting reportedly turned violent.

"What the victim doesn't know is -- (the would-be date) pulls out a gun, demands that he lays on the bed," said Miami Officer Kenia Fallat.

The suspect, identified as Roger Euceda, then allegedly let in his alleged partner-in-crime so the pair could rob the home.

"Both have two brown bags and they start ransacking the victim's home," Fallat said. "He gave him his address. And that's a big no-no."

Police advise never to give personal information to anyone you first meet online; meet in a public place instead. If something doesn't feel right, trust your gut and end the date. Or if you feel threatened, call police.

Even tech experts agree.

"Know who they are, because you don't know who somebody is unless personally you've met them," said Andrew Felix, founder of Tech Launch Pad.

Euceda and his alleged accomplice were both arrested and face charges of home invasion robbery. The victim was unharmed physically.

"In this case, this victim was lucky enough to walk away," Fallat said.

Follow Janine Stanwood on Twitter @JanineStanwood

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