Study finds majority of people tolerate statins

The world’s largest study into statins finds that intolerance to cholesterol-lowering medication is often overestimated and overdiagnosed.

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. – The world’s largest study into Statins finds that intolerance to cholesterol-lowering medication is often overestimated and overdiagnosed.

Endocrinologist Dr. Paul Jellinger with the Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Care said the study found that less than ten percent of people taking statin medications suffer any side effects. The most commonly reported are cramps and muscle aching.

“It turns out in this study and in other studies, a lot of that muscle aching symptomatology comes from what’s called a ‘nocebo’ effect, as opposed to the placebo effect. The nocebo effect is the anticipation, by the patient that the drug will have this side effect because of the publicity it has received and the association with some muscle side effects,” Jellinger said.

He said it’s important to evaluate a patient’s symptoms carefully to determine if the medication really is the issue.

The study found that the ‘nocebo’ effect could be responsible for more than fifty percent of all symptoms, rather than the drug itself.

And with the continued spread of Covid-19, medical experts are raising awareness about the potential effect on the kidneys.

Dr. Sevag Demirjian with the Cleveland Clinic said some patients suffer short-term stress on their kidneys which can heal with time but those with chronic underlying conditions can have permanent kidney damage, leading to dialysis.

Demirjian said if you notice any changes in urination, swelling in the legs, or unusual tiredness you should contact your doctor.


About the Authors:

Veteran journalist Kathleen Corso is the special projects producer for Local 10 News.

Kristi Krueger has built a solid reputation as an award-winning medical reporter and effervescent anchor. She joined Local 10 in August 1993. After many years co-anchoring the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m., Kristi now co-anchors the noon newscasts, giving her more time in the evening with her family.