Miami-Dade commissioners approve mayor’s proposed 1% property tax cut

Reduction goes into effect Oct. 1

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Fla. – Miami-Dade County commissioners have approved Mayor Daniella Levine Cava’s proposal to cut the countywide UMSA, library and fire millage rates by 1%.

This is the first property tax cut in the county in over a decade, and the lowest combined millage rate since 1982-1983.

“Miami-Dade is facing a true affordability crisis,” the mayor said in a statement Tuesday. “Families across our community are suffering because they are unable to afford a home or pay their rent. We owe it to them to provide immediate relief and take urgent action to ensure residents can continue to live and work in Miami-Dade.

“That’s why my proposed budget reduces the millage rate for the first time in a decade – a nearly $25 million cut – while at the same time investing in the future by funding targeted relief and solutions to the housing crisis.”

Levine Cava included the proposal in the county’s $10.3 billion budget. The property tax rate of $467 per $100,000 of taxable value would go down to $462.

“In total the proposed budget invests over $500 million in expanding housing that people can afford, and offering relief to thousands of residents on the biggest issue they are facing – the rising costs of housing,” the mayor’s statement read. “We will also enhance public safety and crime prevention, expand transit, invest in small business, expand key environmental protections, and more.

“This budget proposal balances our community’s short-term needs while taking on our biggest challenges, in order to deliver the best results for our residents. We can accomplish all this while offering relief to both homeowners and renters. That relief begins with this 1% cut.”

The reduction goes into effect on Oct. 1.


About the Authors:

Amanda Batchelor is the Digital Executive Producer for Local10.com.

Michael Putney came to Local 10 in 1989 to become senior political reporter and host of "This Week In South Florida with Michael Putney." He is Local 10's senior political reporter.