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Despite far more support, kneeling might not be widespread

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Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved

FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2018, file photo, Washington Redskins running back Adrian Peterson (26) stands for the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Tennessee Titans in Nashville, Tenn. NFL players who want to kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racism have far more support than Colin Kaepernick did four years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski, File)

NFL players who want to kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racism have far more support than Colin Kaepernick did four years ago.

Still, it might not be widespread for a few reasons.

If organizations insist on unity, as some coaches and front-office executives have mentioned, that could be a hurdle.

Another potential drawback is the growing belief among some players that kneeling is no longer necessary to raise awareness because George Floyd’s death has ignited nationwide protests over racial injustice and police brutality.

Lastly, some owners might still have an issue with it despite the league’s support of the players.

“Whatever our team ends up doing, we’re gonna support. But we’re gonna do it together as a team,” Colts general manager Chris Ballard said.

Cleveland Browns coach Kevin Stefanski, Green Bay Packers coach Matt LaFleur and several other coaches also expressed their support of the players, but mentioned they want it to be a team decision.

“That’s something that I promise you we will spend as much time as necessary as an organization listening to each other, understanding each other, and then we’ll make a decision together,” Stefanski said.