Miami Rescue Mission becomes ‘The Caring Place’ still supporting South Floridians in need

The Miami Rescue Mission and its sister program, Broward Outreach Centers, officially became “The Caring Place.”

MIAMI – The Miami Rescue Mission has become “The Caring Place,” still supporting South Floridians in need for the last 100 years.

The Miami Rescue Mission first opened its doors in the 1920s. A century later, the needs of the poor and hungry remain the same. The vision of “No One is Homeless” is a daily pursuit.

“We’re feeding people who are coming to us just for the food, just for that meal, that sit down meal, and families come as well as the homeless,” said Marilyn Brummit, Director of Development.

Through depressions, recessions, pandemics and inflation, the Miami Rescue Mission has stood the test of time.

A pillar of faithfulness for all to see, stretching across Northwest First Avenue and 20th Street in Miami.

“We have 600 beds in all of our facilities. It’s about 1,500 meals per day and for the fall season it’s 250,000 meals,” said Brummit.

At its centennial celebration in October, The Miami Rescue Mission and its sister program, Broward Outreach Centers, officially became “The Caring Place.”

“We care in everything that we do, every meal that we serve, the clothing that we give out. It’s all about that individual,” said Brummit.

The program cares for people like Alfonso, who got his second chance at the mission and now works in the warehouse.

And father of three, Brian Pollack was able to overcome a troubled past.

“I was a functional alcoholic. I still had a job, but I wasn’t in my right mind. I came in and spiritually and God did the rest,” said Pollack.

Brian graduated from the non-profit’s two-year recovery program and his since become the head chef.

“We’re a conduit here at The Caring Place. It flows in, it flows out. And, we make sure that it goes to the most-needy families and the most-needy people that are in our community,” said Pollack.

This year The Caring Place will host street side celebrations for Thanksgiving at all of its centers.

“And that’s our whole philosophy during these 100 years and we’re just saying to the public continue caring, continue to make a difference,” said Brummit.

To find out how you can help the South Florida community, visit our “Day of Giving” page by clicking on this link.


About the Author:

Mayte Padron Cordones is an Emmy-award winning journalist and the director of WPLG's Community Relations Department, overseeing the station's outreach initiatives to benefit and strengthen the South Florida community.