Gimenez declares state of emergency as Eta strengthens in Caribbean

Eta turns deadly in Central America turns back to Cuba, South Florida
Eta turns deadly in Central America turns back to Cuba, South Florida

MIAMI – Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez declared a state of emergency on Friday as Eta was set to cause flooding on Sunday and Monday in areas of South Florida.

The impact of heavy rainfall and gusty winds will start late Saturday afternoon. Gimenez urged residents to expect tropical-storm-force winds beginning Sunday.

South Floridians to feel the worst of Eta on Sunday
South Floridians to feel the worst of Eta on Sunday

Residents in mobile homes and low-lying areas need to evacuate. Miami-Dade County will be opening an evacuation center at 2 p.m. Saturday at 10901 Coral Way, Gate 2. Authorities are asking people to bring blankets, pillows, medicine, and facial coverings.

Authorities are asking residents to secure objects that winds could blow around, such as garbage carts, patio furniture, garden tools, and toys.

Flood-prone area residents prepare for Eta's rain in South Florida
Flood-prone area residents prepare for Eta's rain in South Florida

Workers are doing what they can to keep storm drains clear of debris.

“Facing challenges of flooding and mosquito breeding, people need to help keep debris out of curbs and drain fields. Bag it, don’t blow it,” Miami-Dade Commissioner Sally Heyman said in a statement.

Saturday is a good day to prepare for windy Sunday in South Florida
Saturday is a good day to prepare for windy Sunday in South Florida

After impacting Central America as a hurricane, the storm made a U-turn and was moving across the Caribbean towards Cuba. Hurricane Eta killed dozens in Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Authorities in Nicaragua and Honduras are still assessing the damage.

Eta keeps South Florida under flood watch
Eta keeps South Florida under flood watch

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